Upcoming

what i’ve been working on for the past few months

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C O L L A B O R A T I ON S   WITH OTHER ARTISTS 

S H O R T   P L A Y S

14/48 Play Festival in 2017

 

I will be participating in 14/48: The World’s Quickest Theater Festival on it’s second weekend: January 13-14! GULP! Writing two plays in 48 hours!

From 14/48’s website:

The 14/48 Projects is very pleased to bring 14/48: The World’s Quickest Theater Festival, its “punishing artistic exercise in speed and endurance” (The Stranger), back to ACT Theatre for two weekends in January 2017 as a partner in ACTLab.

14/48: The World’s Quickest Theater Festival operates under a simple premise: gather some of Seattle’s most daring theater artists and put them in a pressure cooker. But the challenge is far from simple, and that is 14 plays written, cast, directed, rehearsed, scored, designed, and premiered in 48 hours

Check out the artist roster to see the awesome people I’ll be collaborating with! Go see the first weekend as well—which will feature Maggie Lee (Mrs. Yi in Do It For Umma)!

What’s up in December

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Sleep is for the Weak 24-Hour Play Festival

Reserve free tickets HERE

ONE PERFORMANCE ONLY – DECEMBER 17 @ 8:00 PM

For the fourth consecutive year, SLEEP IS FOR THE WEAK will connect local new play artists with one another and stretch the limits of unlikely collaborations. In the span of 24 continuous hours, dozens of artists will work together to write, rehearse, and perform seven original works. With playwrights locked in the theatre overnight, this is a new play series with the blood of a reality competition.

Playwrights, directors, and actors will be randomly grouped and then together face challenges constructed to encourage risk-taking in the creative process. Each team will tackle its own production condition, with one group creating an original ten minute musical, for which they will be joined by a composer and musicians.

Though the framework has been created by Theatre Battery, the content is completely in the hands of the participating artists and the most up-to-date expression of their world. Participants include Theatre Battery regulars, past collaborators from main stage and developmental projects, and a host of new entries from the Puget Sound area.

The 2016 festival company includes:

Playwrights: Jessica Andrewartha, Amontaine Aurore, Stacy Flood, Joshua Hamilton, Kait Mahoney, Matthew Reed (Composer), Mari Salinas, Seayoung Yim

Directors: Omar Forrest, Scott Francis, Parker Kennedy, Phillip Lacey, Mic Montgomery, Nicole Sleiers, Kathryn Stewart

Actors: Jessica Askew, Jaron Boggs, Caitlin Castro, Laura Dux, Melissa Fleming, Arika Gloud, Yasmin Habib, Annelih GH Hamilton, Lauren Christianne Hardcastle, Charles Hawkins, Lia Lee, Kevin Lin, Danielle Alexis Nicole Mitchell, Tamanh Nguyen, Maizy Perdue, Jim Quatier, Aviona Rodriguez-Brown, Tiana Ross, Anna Saephan, Corey Spruill, Emily Jo Testa, Brittney Townsend, Owen Yen

And more to be announced.

Hosted by Kent Station
438 Ramsay Way, Suite 103
Kent, WA 98032
[Next to Christopher & Banks]

Radical Hospitality: No Cost Admission for All

A Quality Education Reading at Theatre Battery

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My play A Quality Education was one of three plays that was workshopped and presented as a staged reading as part of Theatre Battery’s Battery Powered Reading Series at Kent Station. The reading was directed by the fabulous Lily Raabe, who asked really thought-provoking questions during the rehearsal process that helped me make revisions.

Play description: In an elite private school, students and staff of contrasting backgrounds must each navigate their places of power… and the starting line is not the same for everyone.

CAST:
Susan Echols-Orton as Coral
Maya Burton as Jasmine
Mikayla Asianique Johnson as Emily
Joshua Hamilton as Kev
Alfonso Campos as Sanford
Matt Sherrill as Jonny
Annelih GH Hamilton as Elfreda
Owen Yen as Quang
Aaron Jin as Lanh
Samantha Routh as Denise

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Cast of A Quality Education. Photo by Minami Furuya

DOING IT FOR UMMA again at Theatre Off Jackson

Sara Porkalob (director) and I co-produced the second production with Theatre off Jackson. Thanks to everyone who supported us and helped us DO IT AGAIN, FOR UMMA!

We had a successful Kickstarter campaign that funded our show and we will be donating the stretch amount to the Black Lives Matter Movement.  Watch our funny trailer video.

We had a wonderfully diverse audience demographic turn out for our show. For each night, at least 75% of the audience was AAPI (Asian American, Pacific Islander) and a wide range of ages were represented as well, from college freshman groups to Korean senior citizens. There was also a large turnout of families. We had  range of members from community organizations attend such as, LGBTQ Allyship, Got Green, Seattle Asian Film Festival, Gabriella Seattle, Asian Counseling and Referral Service, Wing Luke Asian Museum, Sahngnoksoo, Soobak, and OneAmerica.

All of the AAPI actors in our show have repeatedly voiced how empowering it is to be in a show where being Asian isn’t illustrated as the “other” but instead is the focus of the story. Our audience has also been incredibly vocal about their appreciation of the production, how the Korean family dynamic is their personal story, and how this is the first time they’ve seen anything close to resembling their childhood onstage. The mother/daughter dynamic is also something that really resonates with our audience-a lot of AAPI women have approached us to say that we were able to capture and depict a relationship that, while often painful, was handled with compassion and humor on-stage and really showcased the complex relationship between immigrant mothers and American born children.

Two women from the Korean cultural group, Oolleemm, came up to me after a performance and told me the show made them weep. They said it was so great to see a Korean story on stage and it moved them deeply. They were complete strangers, yet they embraced me as if we were family. They also said they would like to collaborate on a future project incorporating Korean cultural dance.

MEDIA COVERAGE:

Production photos by Ian Johnston of Dangerpants Photography